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National Weather Service of Cleveland Issues Unofficial “Small Dog Warning” Wind Advisory

By Kendall Curley    February 15, 2019 at 07:48PM

 

Image via iStock.com/kozorog

 

On Feb. 12, a wind advisory was issued by the National Weather Service (NWS) for the Ohio counties of Lucas, Wood, Ottawa, Sandusky, Erie, Hancock, Seneca and Huron. The NWS cautioned the public that winds could reach gusts of up to 40-50 mph.

 

According to WTOL 11, the advisory warned that the strong winds could cause “power outages and property damage and could make driving with high-profile vehicles difficult.”

 

The NWS Cleveland’s Twitter account had an additional warning for the public with their wind advisory statement. They cautioned owners of small dogs to stay safe with the exclamation, “Hold on to your pooch!”

 

 

The unofficial “Small Dog Warning” wind advisory may seem silly, but it also something that most pet owners may not have thought about.

 

So, if you are experiencing particularly high winds, you should probably hold on to your pooch!

 

 

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One of the Last Animal Testing Sites in the Country Is Being Investigated

By Samantha Schwab    February 15, 2019 at 07:59PM

 

Image via iStock.com/Vesnaandjic

 

 

The Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center—one of the last sites in the country still performing tests on dogs—is being investigated at the request of lawmakers.

 

The investigation is exploring whether the medical center for veterans performed taxpayer-funded animal testing without the approval by the former VA secretary, which is required by law.

 

According to Fox 8, a new shipment of dogs are expected to arrive at the facility for testing next week.

 

“It’s 2019 and there has got to be a better way to conduct this type of research that doesn’t involve experimentation on animals that causes significant pain and distress but that also helps our veterans the way our veterans deserve to be helped,” Sharon Harvey, the CEO of the Cleveland Animal Protective League, tells the outlet.

 

According to Fox 8, the agency claims that they have developed devices that can restore effective breathing and coughing to veterans living with spinal cord injuries with the help of canine testing.

 

 

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If You’re a Dog Owner in Michigan, You Need a Dog License

By Samantha Schwab    February 18, 2019 at 03:49PM

 

Image via iStock.com/mikkelwilliam

 

 

Michigan law states that “every owned dog must have a dog license to the county you live in,” according to WILX 10.

 

The purpose of a dog license if to let everyone know that your dog is updated on their rabies vaccination, and it “enables Animal control officers to return your dog quickly if found,” according to the Ottawa County website.

 

“A dog license could be the difference between your dog being lost permanently or brought home by an animal control officer if it was to get out,” Kate Turner from Ingham County Animal Control tells WILX 10.

 

If a Michigan resident is caught without having a dog license, they may be given a citation with a fee they must pay.

 

 

For more interesting new stories, check out these articles: 

 

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Preserved Great White Shark Found in Abandoned Australian Wildlife Park

 

Monkey Found After Being Stolen From Palm Beach Zoo

 

Dog Mode Feature Coming to Tesla Cars

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Missing Dog Found 175 Miles Away After 8 Months

By Samantha Schwab    February 19, 2019 at 06:05PM

 

Image via Responsible Pet Care of Oxford Hills/Facebook

 

 

Kaiser, a 5-year-old King Shepherd, was found 175 miles away from his Massachusetts residence eight months after he jumped his family’s 6-foot fence while a woman was dog sitting him, according to USA TODAY.

 

The Woollacott family never gave up hope, though. “I spent like three or four weeks just putting 1,500 miles on my car. Every day. He’d been seen around here for like a month, and then at Mt. Watatic about a half-hour from my house, then up in Greenville, New Hampshire, 12 hours later,” Tom Woollacott tells Bangor Daily News. “Then he was seen in Pepperell [Massachusetts]. I talked to a lady who had walked into her horse barn. She said, ‘I thought it was a wolf.’ But by the time I got there, he was gone.”

 

Woollacott even used a drone to search for Kaiser, but to with no success.

 

After being fed by a woman in Bethel, Massachusetts, for three weeks, Kaiser was brought to the Responsible Pet Care of Oxford Hills in South Paris, a no-kill shelter. The shelter posted Kaiser’s photo on Facebook and received a ton of reactions.

 

The woman who was dog sitting Kaiser was contacted through the grapevine and sent in pictures to the shelter. Although Kaiser looked different than the photos at the time, the shelter staff knew it was him.

 

“It was funny. We said, ‘It’s not the same dog. The pictures don’t even look the same.’ … When I went out to the intake area, I was like, ‘Hey, Grizz,’ and he kept his head down. Then I said, ‘Kaiser,’ and he just looked me dead in the eye. I went to the office and said, ‘I think that’s him,’” board member and volunteer Morgan Miles tells Bangor Daily News.

 

Woollacott called the shelter that week and recalled “pretty much every lump and bump” on his dog, Miles tells the outlet. Woollacott drove through the snow the next day to retrieve his dog.

 

“He clearly is the only one who knows truly what happened,” Miles tells Bangor Daily News. “Somebody could have picked him up or he could easily have traveled that distance himself over eight months. Honestly, I think he meandered all the way by himself.”

 

 

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Auto-Tuned Cat Is the Mixtape Drop We’ve All Been Waiting For

By Kendall Curley    February 20, 2019 at 08:22PM

 

Image via Twitter/Joaquin Baldwin

 

If you are a cat owner, you know that sometimes cats have a lot of opinions. And cats don’t normally keep them to themselves. They like to share them in a not-so-symphonic manner that ends up being more like a barrage of impressively varied “meows.”

 

One man, Joaquin Baldwin, decided to share his cat’s decidedly unmelodious gifts—but with a twist. He used an auto-tune app to give his feline friend, Elton, a new, more hip sound.

 

 

And let’s just say, once this video hit the internet, Elton’s career went from zero to a hundred real quick.

 

Twitter users are even creating their own song remixes of Elton’s auto-tuned meows.

 

 

 

Keep up the good work Elton, and don’t be selfish with your gift. Share it with the world!

 

 

For more interesting new stories, check out these articles: 

 

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Family Warns Small Dog Owners of Hawks After Yorkie Was Snatched

By Samantha Schwab    February 20, 2019 at 08:29PM

 

Image via iStock.com/Piotr Krzeslak

 

 

Dog owner Cecilia Celis is warning pet parents of the threat of hawks after her 2-pound Yorkie, Lulu, was snatched by a large bird outside their home in Nevada.

 

“We just hear them barking and crying,” Celis tells ABC 13. “So we are like, ‘Oh, they’re just play fighting.’ And a second later I just look outside. We see a huge bird…like the wing, like, fly up. So I run up and I yell at the bird, I’m like, ‘Get off my dog! Get off!'”

 

Celis fought for her dog’s life. The outlet reports that Celis grabbed a pillow, and according to the outlet, “The bird finally let go after three hits.”

 

The family’s surveillance camera caught the whole thing on tape.

 

 

Video via ABC 13

 

Immediately after the incident, Celis brought Lulu to the veterinarian–who confirmed that Lulu was not injured.

 

“I thought she was going to die or something because that’s a big bird compared to her,” Celis tells the outlet. “We were lucky.”

 

 

For more interesting new stories, check out these articles: 

 

Auto-Tuned Cat Is the Mixtape Drop We’ve All Been Waiting For

 

Missing Dog Found 175 Miles Away After 8 Months

 

CDC Warns of Spike in Cases of Chronic Wasting Disease in Deer, Elk and Moose

 

One of the Last Animal Testing Sites in the Country Is Being Investigated

 

“Horse Barber” Turns Horses’ Coats Into Works of Art

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Could Dogs Survive in a World Without Humans?


By Dr. Joanna Pendergrass    April 29, 2019 at 01:57PM

 

We love our dogs and cherish them as family members. We take them to the veterinarian’s office when they’re sick, buy them creature comforts and willingly pick up their poop. We’ve also become connected with our dogs on such a deep emotional level that it can be hard to imagine our lives without them.

 

When was the last time, though, that you considered whether dogs could live without us? Could our dogs survive without us providing them with food, shelter and love? Could they make it on their own in a world without humans?

 

To consider these questions, let’s first take a brief history lesson on dog domestication.

 

When and How Were Dogs Domesticated?

 

Dog domestication was an extremely important turning point in human history. However, there’s scientific debate on exactly when that domestication began; estimates range from about 10,000 to nearly 40,000 years ago.

 

It’s even suspected that dogs were domesticated twice—in Asia and in Europe. So, the time point at which the first domesticated dog came onto the scene is still not conclusively known.

 

In addition, multiple theories exist on how dog domestication happened. One theory is that early humans captured and raised wolf pups, eventually domesticating them. Another theory, known as “survival of the friendliest,” suggests that wolves domesticated themselves when early humans were hunter-gatherers.

 

What’s clear is that domestic dogs have been around humans for a long time. In this time, dogs have become highly skilled at understanding and interpreting human behavior.

 

Numerous studies have demonstrated just how attuned dogs can be to our emotions, facial expressions and daily routines. Therefore, it’s no surprise that our dogs know when we’re sad or anxious and can respond to us according to the tone of our voice or our body language.

 

What Would Dogs Do Without Us?

 

Domestication has led dogs to become dependent on humans for pretty much everything. They look to us to feed them, walk them, protect them and care for them when they’re sick. So, could they really survive in a world without humans? What would this world look like for dogs if all humans disappeared?

 

You could imagine that a world without humans would be pretty disorienting for a domestic dog—No more dog beds, food bowls, leashes, squeaky dog toys or belly rubs. No more obedience training, doggy play dates or trips to the vet’s office.

 

Essentially, dogs would be faced with a world in which they would have to completely fend for themselves to eat, stay safe and ultimately survive.

 

It’s likely that, with time, dogs would learn to adjust, survive and potentially thrive in a world without us. Besides, nearly 80 percent of the world’s dogs today are free-ranging; therefore, not having humans around wouldn’t matter much to most dogs.

 

Dogs Would Need New Survival Skills

 

Surviving without humans would require having some survival skills, such as forming relationships and alliances with other animals (even cats!), having an independent personality, being street-savvy, being able to rapidly adapt to changing conditions, and having a willingness to take some risks.

 

Size might matter, too: medium- to large-breed dogs could fare better than teacup-size dogs (like Shih Tzus) or giant breed dogs (like Great Danes).

 

Interbreeding With Other Animals Is Likely

 

Interbreeding with other animals, particularly coyotes and wolves, would also be important for dogs’ survival in a world without humans. Such interbreeding would produce offspring that could survive and thrive without humans and thus pass on survival genes to future generations.

 

Finding Shelter Would Be Trial-and-Error

 

Without human shelters, dogs would need to find places to live, such as burrows, that would provide natural protection from predators. This would take some trial-and-error as the dogs adjust to their new environment and develop their survival skills.

 

With all of the adjustments and skills required to survive in a world without humans, it’s possible that not all domestic dogs would be able to adapt. But those able to adapt would learn how to survive and even thrive in their new environment.

 

Let’s hope, though, that our best friends will not have to experience life without us any time soon.

 

Featured Image: iStock.com/DimaBerkut

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Why Do Dogs Bring You Their Toys to Greet You?


By Wailani Sung    May 01, 2019 at 04:57PM

 

Each time you come home, it is heartwarming to be greeted enthusiastically by your dog at the door. And each dog’s greeting ritual is unique—some dogs might wag their tail and lick their owners, and other might jump on their owners or whine or bark at them in greeting.

 

One of the more quirky greetings is when a dog greets you with his favorite toy in his mouth. If you have a dog that likes to offer dog toys to you upon your arrival home, you may wonder why.

 

The answer may be a bit complicated because different dogs have different motivations for bringing a toy to the door. Here are three of the most common reasons.

 

Your Dog Wants to Play

 

While you were busy at work or running errands, your dog was home snoozing the day away, because there’s really not much else to do while you are gone. That’s why when you come home, it can very well be the highlight of his day.

 

This excitement can sometimes last for the rest of the night, or your pup may just have an initial bout of energy right when you get home.

 

For some dogs, this excitement can stem from wanting some playtime with you, especially if you typically play with your dog right away when you return.

 

It doesn’t take very long for a dog to learn that it’s playtime when you return home. When your dog brings you a toy, it is his way of saying, “Come play with me!”

 

Most owners provide their dogs with a variety of dog toys that engage them in different ways for mental and physical stimulation.

 

The toy your pup chooses to present to you may be a toy that you use most often to play with him. If you like this greeting behavior, keep on playing with him when you return home.

 

Your Dog Wants to Show Their Toy Off

 

Some dogs may present their favorite dog toy to their owners but not necessarily want to play right at that moment. They will prance in front of you and appear to “show off” their toy, then retreat whenever you reach for the toy.

 

So you may be wondering, if they don’t want to give up their precious toy, then why would they bring it up to me? Well, how do you respond to this behavior? If you start talking to him and giving him extra attention, he may enjoy that type of engagement.

 

These dogs may have learned that their owners give them more attention when they hold something in their mouth, and they like the undivided attention they get when they show off their favorite toy.

 

It could also be that some dogs think of it as a game of keep-away. Regardless of the dog’s motivation, he got what he wanted: YOU interacting with him.

 

Your Excitable Dog Needs a Distraction

 

For dogs that exhibit a lot of excitable behavior, such as barking or nipping, you may encourage them to go get a toy to redirect their exuberant behavior. Or, you may give your dog a toy as soon as you step through the door to keep your dog’s mouth busy.

 

This is a good solution for dogs that get overexcited and cannot control themselves. It is difficult for a dog to bark and nip when they are holding an item in their mouth.

 

After numerous repetitions, a dog can learn to grab a dog toy right away when he hears his owner at the door. Instead of forcing the dog to sit still, we can give them a different outlet for their energy.

 

So you may have inadvertently started this ritual toy offering, and now your pup has learned it.

 

From a simple tail wag to offering favorite toys, every dog has a different greeting style. And some just happen to be toy bringers!

 

 

Featured Image: iStock.com/gollykim

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Dog Goods USA LLC Expands Voluntary Recall to Include Berkley Jensen Pig Ears Pet Treats Because of Possible Salmonella Health Risk

By Samantha Schwab    September 05, 2019 at 02:42PM

 

Company: Dog Goods USA LLC

Brand Name: Berkley Jensen 

Recall Date: 09/03/2019

 

 

Product: Berkley Jensen Pig Ears Treats, 30-packs, sold at BJ’s Wholesale Club stores.

 

Reason for Recall: 

 

Dog Goods is voluntarily expanding their previous recall to include all 30-packs of “Berkley Jensen” brand pig ears sold at BJ’s Wholesale Club stores. Dog Goods purchased these pig ears from a single supplier in Brazil from September 2018 through August 2019.

 

What to Do:

 

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

 

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals and humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian. 

 

Consumers who have purchased the products are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact us at 786-401-6533 from Monday to Friday 9am EST through 5pm EST.

 

 

Source: FDA

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New Study Finds That Dog Owners Live Longer and Are More Likely to Survive Heart Attacks

By Kendall Curley    October 09, 2019 at 03:01PM

 

Any dog parent can tell you that having a furry best friend has a whole slew of benefits, from providing endless cuddles to having a loyal PIC (partner in crime). Dogs have long been considered excellent companions for humans, but recent studies suggest that dogs are helping us even more than just providing us with love and friendship.

 

One of the studies—Dog Ownership and Survival After a Major Cardiovascular Event—found that dog owners get these extra health benefits when compared to non-dog owners:

 

  • A 33% lower risk of death for heart attacks in people living alone after hospitalization

  • A 15% lower risk of death for heart attacks in people living with a partner or child

  • A 27% lower risk of death in stroke patients that live alone after hospitalization

  • A 12% lower risk of death in stroke patients that live with a partner or child

 

To gather this data, the study used the Swedish National Patient Register to identify patients aged 40-85 that presented with an acute myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke between the dates of January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2012. They looked at sociodemographic information, dog ownership data and cause of death for patients, if applicable.

 

Tove Fall, co-author of this study and professor of molecular epidemiology at Uppsala University in Sweden, explains that dog ownership can give pet parents the motivation to get up and move, and this helps dogs get the exercise they need to stay healthy.

 

By getting this exercise, pet parents are avoiding the sedentary lifestyle that can contribute to premature death. Fall also emphasizes that the companionship of dogs can also help combat the loneliness that can lead to a sedentary lifestyle. 

 

In the other study, researchers performed a meta-analysis and examined patient data for over 3.8 million people taken from 10 separate studies. What they found was that compared to non-dog owners, dog owners had a:

 

  • 24% reduced risk of all-cause mortality

  • 65% reduced risk of mortality after a heart attack

  • 31% reduced risk of mortality from cardiovascular-related issues

 

However, while these studies create promising associations between dog ownership and human health, they do not prove causation or a definite link between the two.

 

As Dr. Haider Warraich, director of the heart failure program at the Boston VA Healthcare System, instructor at Harvard Medical school and author of “State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science and Future of Heart Disease,” explains to NBC News that while these studies are “interesting and provocative,” he says, “it’s not enough to have me recommend patients adopt a dog to lower their risk of death.”

 

And don’t worry if you are not a dog person—experts suggest that you can start with any pet, including fish or small animals. NBC News explains, “Even those kinds of pets can provide a benefit, albeit a smaller one. In fact, an earlier study showed that just caring for crickets could make people healthier.”

 

So at the end of the day, it would seem that having a companion—whether canine, feline, big or small—comes with health benefits.

 

Featured Image: iStock.com/Vesnaandjic